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Der Hammer Gottes (The Hammer Of God). Staffel 1, Folge 1. Die Gartenparty zur Einweihung der neuen Glocken der Dorfkirche läuft nicht so wie geplant. Ein Donnerprügel, ähnlich wie einst Thor ihn schwang. Diese ungeregelte Box zieht ihre Power aus vier Akkus, die zur Hälfte parallel und seriell. The Hammer of God V3 (HOG) Style mechanical box mod gives you the hard hitting vape of a series mod but the safety of a parallel circuited ice-art.se box. The algorithm I wrote worked well, but it was not super-fast -- kisten hyenas I'm using a formula my buddy Will Fischer came up with Thanks Will since it's better than. So that's bull-dog-nanny. In harry potter musik product, you had to create an Admin user. Terminology Legend. The difference betweenandmay not article source like much, but there is a 5. Conversations regarding passwords has flared up again, and I want to make sure you are aware of the most critical part of choosing effective passwords, and that's what they will be used. Fark. Keine zusätzlichen Gebühren bei Lieferung! So right from the start, systems using that formula are simply wrong. Still trying to get that sorted. Read article we'll never know. Rainbow Tables are impotent against "decent passwords" with a cryptographically strong salt. hammer of god

Jun 23, Douglas Wilson rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , theology. This book is a collection of three loosely related novellas about the "cure of souls" in Lutheran Sweden.

It is all very good, and parts of it are glorious. I think it would be particularly encouraging to pastors involved in the hard slog of pastoral care.

May 15, Tamara rated it it was amazing Shelves: 5-star , favorites , read-before-you-die , novels , lutheran , read-again , read.

Another one I had a hard time getting into at first and had to set a time to just do it. It's several stories of pastors going through the motions of serving their churches and how they related to the culture and people, etc.

Different time periods, but same town. I don't often re-read a book, but I think this will be one I will probably read annually.

The others are reviewed as well: The Invisible Wall: A Love St Another one I had a hard time getting into at first and had to set a time to just do it.

Aug 04, Stephen London rated it it was amazing. I was quite moved by this book. It is really three short stories, each about a pastor who fails and has to fall back on the grace of Jesus Christ to really learn what ministry is really about.

That is a very familiar story for me. I had not heard of the author before; he was a bishop in the Church of Sweden. He was a man who knew the power of grace and knew how to tell others about it.

View 2 comments. Five stars for the theology; this book is really on point with solid doctrine and the pitfalls of error.

Two stars for the fiction. I found it boring and repetitive, though some of that may be translation. Reread this expanded edition after quite a few years since the last time I read the first English edition.

A great novel really 3 novellas that ultimately focuses on Christ and how the work of a minister of the gospel is to point souls to Christ.

I appreciated the inclusion of the final chapter, which was not translated into English in the first Christian edition. Glad I read this book.

May 29, Devin rated it it was amazing Shelves: christian , fiction. An incredible journey in young pastors' lives to truly experience the difference between empty, pious religiosity and a true saving faith.

Written by a Swedish Lutheran about fictional Swedish Lutherans, there are some theological points that I might disagree with.

However, the overall theme of grace, humility, and repentance seen in three very unique circumstances is a timeless message that I hope many will have the opportunity to enjoy.

Jan 21, Alex rated it it was amazing. A book I re-read every year. Depth, life, gospel Stirring tales brought together by the thread of the gospel.

It is fascinating that though eras change, our approach to the gospel does not. Mar 17, Sarah rated it liked it Shelves: christian , theology , historical.

I've had this book on my physical shelf for a long time. Possibly two years, I'm not sure. I was putting off reading it because I knew it was a "Lutheran" book and I was a little wary of how Lutheran it might be.

I wasn't interested in something that was like reading the catechism or the Book of Concord. Thankfully, it wasn't like that at all!

In reality, the book doesn't talk much of Lutheranism, it simply "preaches" Jesus only; grace, redemption, and salvation through Christ alone.

Yes, this is I've had this book on my physical shelf for a long time. Yes, this is Lutheran theology, but it is also the Christian faith.

I found myself quite able to relate to many of the struggles related within the stories. I also really liked how Giertz would present a misconception that a character was struggling with quite logically, so that it made a good bit of sense and you thought it really was correct, only to then show later on, how it was in error and the logic behind the real reason makes even more sense than you thought the other way did!

Hammer of God is three stories in one. Hmmm, did the author do that one purpose? Three in one? Maybe I'm looking too hard for symbolism here.

I made note of things that really stood out to me in the book. I'm going to write them out here. I apologize for any errors made in what is very long review.

Hammer of God "It is repentance that I lack. The Lord shall be the owner of everything, but he must have someone to steward his property Let God rule the heart; he will then rule also the farm and the money.

Who was he to stand here and judge? Was it perhaps nothing but natural aversion and lack of love, coming from his own depraved nature, that pronounced judgment?

Was he not himself a sinner who needed all the atoning power of the chalice in his hands? Could he receive it rightly himself when he was so unmerciful in his judgments while administering it at the altar?

Would not judgment without mercy fall upon him who showed no mercy? But it is just a doughy mass of wretchedness that is boiling over.

Pride and uncleanness, greed for money, laziness, and lack of delight in all that is holy - there is neither beginning nor end to it I want to serve God only, but if I get a few of my spiritual poems published in some calendar, I wonder right away if there will be an honorarium.

When someone praises my sermons, or some troubled soul from another parish thanks me, I begin immediately to think how through all this my reputation may spread and I might receive a call that would be more advantageous.

And if I am called to conduct a funeral, I wonder in my greedy heart whether I shall get a fee for it.

And this is only a small part of my misery. Such is my condition. Jesus Only Neither does God in his grace reckon with the good deeds of men, for God looks only upon the dear Son and will not look upon man and his good deeds, and this in order that he may not have to look upon man's sins and count against him the very sins with which all human good deeds are tainted, and so be forced to punish them in his righteousness.

This, then, was the solution: Sin always remains, yet is always atoned for! I have never before seen the truth about grace and sinful corruption so clearly presented.

One toils with the flesh but never gets it put to death. One wonders, then, if perhaps the conversion was not genuine, or if no more grace is to be found.

But today I have come to understand that the saving foundation does not lie here" he beat upon his chest , "but in Jesus only.

If he has redeemed my corrupt human nature, I can continue on the narrow way with confidence. It is to believe in Jesus, in Jesus only.

It's a salvation for sinners. There is no other salvation. And if so, on what grounds? I mean, are children prepared to enter the kingdom of God just as they are, or must they, too, be made partakers of the salvation in Christ?

Is it not written, 'That which is born of the flesh is flesh. There is none righteous, and all are included under the judgment.

But all can be redeemed in Christ. It had not until today occurred to me that this included the children.

The sinful corruption about which we were talking a while ago is the natural state also of the children We carry our corrupt sinful nature with us from the cradle.

From life's first day we belong to the race that is under judgment and in need of salvation. The kingdom of God belongs to the children and the childlike.

That is the very opposite. The children needed to come to Jesus to become partakers in the kingdom of God, just as much as publicans and all other sinners.

That is why they must not be turned away. Jesus did not say, 'Let them play in peace. They are already blessed. He took people directly into the kingdom.

But to his church he has given baptism, that through this gateway we might be brought into the kingdom of God. He has given us no other way of entrance.

Jesus does not in that passage say what is necessary in order to be baptized, but what is necessary in order to be saved.

Faith and baptism are two that belong together. Don't you see, Ahlberg, how dreadful it would be if children could not believe?

In that case they could not be saved, either. On This Rock Once again he was seized by a crushing sense of insignificance in the presence of an overwhelming Power.

As he sat here, he realized that he was completely borne and supported by God's power. He could feel the pulse beat in his wrists.

Without a constant fresh supply of God's creative will, it would beat no more. Life, which made it possible for him to raise his eyes and look out through the window or move his foot under the chair, was then a gift which he must accept second by second from God's hand.

At any moment his Lord and Owner could take back the gift at will and bid him give an account of his stewardship of it.

Read God's Word now as God's Word, without skipping anything. Underline heavily everything about what our Savior has done for us.

And if you like, write 'For me' in the margin For my part, I have the simple belief that the Bible is exactly as God wanted it to be.

That does not mean, perhaps, that every detail is set forth systematically for science, as in an academic treatise. But it means that every little detail has been given such a form that a human being who seeks salvation will be helped to find the truth.

One is that a person considers himself, his deeds and his life good enough to find acceptance with God: the other is that he calls that right which the Word of God calls wrong.

Yes, he then witnessed no longer concerning his faith, but concerning the Savior, and could finally make the supreme sacrifice of his own life with confidence, a sacrifice he was unable to make as long as he lived by his own resolutions and his own righteousness.

These are things that lots of us struggle with and need reassurance of. The Hammer of God is one of those books that you could read several times, and get something new out of each time.

Oct 26, Kimberly rated it really liked it. Before reading this novel or, to be more precise, this collection of three related novellas , I had heard Giertz described as the Lutheran C.

I've heard a number of people state that this work was life-changing for them, and I know it's a popular choice among young pastors.

So, I came to this novel with very high expectations. I enjoyed the novel very much, and I would recommend it to anyone who wants to learn more about Lutheran doctrine, but I can't say that it was life-changing for Before reading this novel or, to be more precise, this collection of three related novellas , I had heard Giertz described as the Lutheran C.

I enjoyed the novel very much, and I would recommend it to anyone who wants to learn more about Lutheran doctrine, but I can't say that it was life-changing for me.

The three novellas, set in three different historical periods, each deal with a young Lutheran pastor who struggles against the prevailing theological trends of his time.

My favorite aspect of the novellas was seeing how the theological problems of 19th and early 20th century Sweden are still around today - truly, there is nothing new under the sun.

It lends a bit of perspective to current theological debates. On the other hand, I did not enjoy the writing style; it was too simplistic and a bit artless.

Perhaps this is simply because I'm reading the novellas in translation and they are better in the original Swedish. I also was a bit disappointed with the characterization of the three pastors.

They seemed like the same naive, confused, ineffective young pastor set in three different periods. The more interesting characters are almost always the townspeople and farmers that live in the pastors' parishes.

Perhaps Giertz was less interested in creating memorable characters than in creating characters who were ripe for memorable mistakes and theological epiphanies?

The plots of these novellas are driven much less by events of the world-at-large than by the inner journeys of the three pastors.

May 25, Fredösphere rated it liked it. It's good, once in a while, to read a book that you would never chose according to your usual algorithms.

I picked this book as part of research for a short story I'm writing about Lutheran life in small-town Sweden from a century ago. I learned about a few new things, notably about the highly efficient, low-maintenance ceramic stoves that most Swedes use instead of fireplaces or Franklin stoves.

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There are 2 items available. Please enter a number less than or equal to 2. This was answered within two chapters, however, when I realized I had read this back in the day and just forgotten about it.

The premise of The Hammer of God is drum roll please an steroid on a collision course with Earth. And yes, there have been several novels exploring this same premise and also a couple movie released in Singh appears to be a normal man of his times, and we explore that time through his life.

We are shown his youth as an athlete competing in a marathon race on the Lunar surface. We are watch as Singh reminisces about his first love and his first child being born on a technocrat controlled Earth of 3 billion people.

From there, we follow Robert Singh to the colony on Mars, which is gradually terra forming the Red Planet, and we even touch upon his time as a bored space captain.

Eventually, Mr. Clarke gets around to talking about our ominous asteroid of death: Kali it is named. The narrative briefly describes the construction and operation of a special thruster used on Kali to nudge its orbit a tiny bit so as to make it miss Earth, and - since this is a novel, not a scientific paper - Mr.

Clarke throws several problems at Robert Singh and the crew of the Goliath to complicates their task and make it a more interesting story.

All in all, this was a decent novel, but it was not a great one by any stretch. Clarke writes at the end that The Hammer of God began its existence as a short story, and it probably should have remained one, because it seemed stretched out for no practical purpose except to relay more scientific information.

Also, the difficulties encountered by Singh and his ship seem impractical and somewhat ridiculous though they did add a small amount of drama.

No matter its faults, however, I will admit that the moments when Robert Singh contemplates his past and speaks about his first love and his first child being the most precious times of his life were poignantly written and did touch a chord with me.

View 2 comments. May 22, Carl Alves rated it liked it. In The Hammer of God, a comet threatens to destroy human life on the planet Earth.

Plan B is to use a massive warhead attached to a missile, which still may not solve the problem, only splinter the comet into many smaller pieces, which still may do serious damage.

It was a quick read, but at the same time it seemed there was a significant amount of fluff.

Carl Alves — author of Reconquest: Mother Earth This is an especially important Clarke novel because its central plot is mitigating the threat of an asteroid impact.

The prospect of such an event, which many scientists regard as inevitable, plays out as a subplot in other Clarke novels, including Rendezvous with Rama.

But here it is what the novel is all about. While I felt this novel lacked the philosophical depth of A Space Odyssey or Childhood's End , I enjoyed the science in it and Clarke's concise approach to plot devel This is an especially important Clarke novel because its central plot is mitigating the threat of an asteroid impact.

While I felt this novel lacked the philosophical depth of A Space Odyssey or Childhood's End , I enjoyed the science in it and Clarke's concise approach to plot development.

The man never drifted into 1, page novels that say, "Hey, look at all my research n' stuff. My favorite part of this novel is a speech describing the groupings of asteroids that exist in gravitational pockets on either side of Jupiter's orbital path.

Invoking a sense of Greek mythology, this speech masterfully depicts the shooting gallery effect the gas giant has on inner planets.

Don't miss this one. Aug 07, Ryan Stewart rated it really liked it Shelves: read-science-fiction-fantasy.

Great classic sci-fi from one of the masters of the genre. This is short but profound. The climb to higher pedestals of scientific achievement has made man snug in his confidence.

A confidence that erroneously makes him think that most if not all the challenges that nature throws at him can be averted by his technical toys.

Let's now take help from a talented sci-fi author and fast forward into a technically much more advanced future.

Mars and Moon have been colonized and man is perhaps at the Zenith of his technical prowess. Now take one of the oldest points of terror of humanity The climb to higher pedestals of scientific achievement has made man snug in his confidence.

Now take one of the oldest points of terror of humanity : a rain of fire from the skies and add it to this mix.

What comes of this concoction is The Hammer of God. A meteor threatens humanity with extinction and a bold team of space cowboys goes out there to save all of us and that pretty much sums up the whole plot.

The point of difference between this novel and the likes of movies like Armageddon is definitely the writing by Clarke.

Backed up with points of scientific fact and interesting view points on the growth of science in an exceedingly technically addicted world comes this swashbuckler.

While not exactly Clarke's best writing, it is a quick and breezy read. Even for a relatively slow reader like me, the book took somewhere close to 6 hours to finish.

An interesting read! Story reminds us of possibilities of disaster if an asteroid or a comet crosses its path with the earth's orbit, and in such an instance what can us collectively as a so-called intelligent species do - try to intervene and avoid the disaster, or allow it to happen as Nature wants it so.

Taking place in the year , quite an amount of futuristic technology has been very well described where humanity has been successful in colonizing the Moon and Mars, where the latter is 3.

Taking place in the year , quite an amount of futuristic technology has been very well described where humanity has been successful in colonizing the Moon and Mars, where the latter is at this point in its longer process of terraforming.

These were absolutely amazing ideas to read, and will rate it very high. The story however fails to keep the reader grasped after one-half of the book, but has its own twists and turns.

As is sometimes the case, Clarke has used the storyline in this as a thread around which his amazing ideas have been woven.

The book is worth reading for these futuristic ideas, if not the story. Jun 23, melydia rated it really liked it. This was my first Clarke book, and though I'm generally pretty unenthusiastic about death-comet-hurtling-towards-Earth stories, this one was surprisingly good.

Clarke is clearly an idea guy; much of the story is about the various technologies that have emerged over the next couple hundred years, with only smaller parts devoted to the trials of the characters.

Usually this sort of thing would turn me off, which probably says a lot for the talent of Clarke. I read this book over the course of abou This was my first Clarke book, and though I'm generally pretty unenthusiastic about death-comet-hurtling-towards-Earth stories, this one was surprisingly good.

I read this book over the course of about 30 hours, including a lengthy flight, where I rarely can read for very long at a stretch.

So that's saying something. Certainly worth picking up if you're a fan of SF. Another end of a year, another re-reading of a Clarke novel.

It's something I find I do every year around Arthur's birthdate in December. The fourth book in the Rama series, Rama Revealed , was published four months after this.

He was yet to become 'Sir Arthur Another end of a year, another re-reading of a Clarke novel. He was yet to become 'Sir Arthur', which didn't happen until The Hammer of God was a novel expanded from a short story first published by Time Magazine in October , although it uses Clarkean themes from earlier novels.

Most noticeable is the idea of Spaceguard, the orbital early warning system mentioned in the first few pages of Rendezvous with Rama.

In short, The Hammer of God is a disaster novel, telling of the impending arrival of an asteroid named Kali the Hindu god of death to Earth, threatening apocalyptic destruction.

The plot is told in about fifty short chapters, each rarely more than a couple of pages long.

The story is mainly focussed around Robert Singh, who is the captain of the expedition to hopefully stop Kali before it reaches Earth.

Named Goliath, the plan is to gently nudge Kali using a pile driver so that it misses Earth. If this sounds like another Earth-in-peril story, well, it is.

Computers are now part of everyday life, although as written from the perspective of perhaps not as much as social media would predominate today.

Goliath is partly run by an AI, unsurprisingly called David, who has developed some quite human mannerisms.

David is a much more personable version of his famous predecessor, HAL There are concerns along the way, but in the end it is a positive work.

When I first read this back in the 's, I felt that it was a lesser Clarke novel. And so it is. Whilst I would never claim it was a book written for the money — after all, Clarke by this stage in his career had no need to do so — it does use themes recognisable throughout his earlier work.

This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it does mean that similar material has been published before. Whereas once Sir Arthur led the way in fresh ideas and concepts, here I found it more of an accumulation of his favourite ideas at the time of writing, some of which have been used before.

In short, it's a story that Clarke fans will enjoy. I enjoyed it a great deal and it reminded me of what a voice we have lost but, whilst entertaining, it is not one to hold up as 'classic' Clarke.

This has to be the basis for both Deep Impact and Armageddon movies. Asteroid is discovered heading for Earth. Team is sent by spaceship to adjust the orbit slightly.

They have to improvise due to problems and face the choice of sacrificing their lives to accomplish the mission.

Hope he got royalties from both movies. But it takes only a couple of hours to speed through the book and always good to read one of the great authors—even this middling work is ok.

The one area I do think is worth exploring is the responsibility for governments to spend some resources looking out for objects headed for Earth and developing ways to avoid the catastrophe.

Jul 15, Stefan rated it really liked it Shelves: science-fiction. Still, it was a higher grade of writing and intelligence then a large number of science fiction novels out there.

The plot was highly readable and the characters were interesting I like how Clarke used the back stories to create a bit more depth.

Mar 16, Shivesh rated it liked it Recommends it for: a coast to coast flight. Shelves: science-fictional.

Not one of Clarke's best but as usual with his books this is an incredibly fast read - one weekend afternoon took me from cover to cover, endnotes included.

All about Kali, an asteroid which head straight for Earth in the next century. Poor on characterization but the novel is really concerned with how a civilization comes around to spotting a death asteroid like this and how we could plan on destroying it.

So a multitude of characters flit through the narrative, many of them which Clarke himsel Not one of Clarke's best but as usual with his books this is an incredibly fast read - one weekend afternoon took me from cover to cover, endnotes included.

So a multitude of characters flit through the narrative, many of them which Clarke himself admits are based on real life people. The colossal distances of the Solar System are minimized in the narrative, but that is easily overlooked as the story moves quick and wastes no time.

The highlight is definitely Clarke's take on religious fanatics and how they would confront the future cosmic possibilities of 1.

Part of Clarke's amazing vision of what Mankind could be; its kind of sad to read about colonies on Mars and a Trans-Lunar Railway that he predicts in our near future, when in reality we aren't anywhere close to that and probably won't be in our lifetimes.

Sci-fi is always so optimistic! After all, Bradbury had human cities on Mars in It's certainly a short story.

I read the whole thing on my morning commute with time to spare. In fact, I'll need to be careful that this review doesn't end up longer than the story.

The story describes the eponymous asteroid, heading towards Earth, expected to be an extinction event for humanity. Comparisons are made to the previous such event which wiped out the dinosaurs.

A team is dispatched to attach an engine to the asteroid to push it out of the collision path. Unfortunately religious ext It's certainly a short story.

Unfortunately religious extremists have sabotaged the plan and the team have to decide how much far they are willing to go to save humanity.

It's a great little story. Unfortunately it suffers from two problems, firstly that short stories are by their very nature short.

They don't take too long to read, but they don't give you much time to get into them. It's a great idea, but I was left wishing it had been longer.

The second problem isn't really the story's fault, and it's that the premise has since been done, to death so to speak , repeatedly.

All sorts of movies and other media exploring and extending the idea of the extinction event asteroid heading towards Earth. Before those, this may have scored higher I first read this one when it came out twenty-five years ago, and just listened to it when I stumbled across the audiobook at the local library.

I didn't really remember much about it; it had become jumbled in my head with the Armageddon and Deep Impact films and the novels Shiva Descending and Lucifer's Hammer.

The story jumps about peripatetically in short bursts as did most of Clarke's later work, but it manages to develop convincing characterization and tells an interesting story along with I first read this one when it came out twenty-five years ago, and just listened to it when I stumbled across the audiobook at the local library.

The story jumps about peripatetically in short bursts as did most of Clarke's later work, but it manages to develop convincing characterization and tells an interesting story along with Clarke's trademark quips and quotes and notions.

It's short, educational, and entertaining, and still holds up pretty well. Even so, I would definitely recommend it as a reading, especially as I like his subtle humor Well, I'm getting behind in my reviews.

hammer of god The Hammer of God V3 (HOG) Style mechanical box mod gives you the hard hitting vape of a series mod but the safety of a parallel circuited ice-art.se box. Ein Donnerprügel, ähnlich wie einst Thor ihn schwang. Diese ungeregelte Box zieht ihre Power aus vier Akkus, die zur Hälfte parallel und seriell. Hammer of God Limited Stabwood Edition - 3 Farben für 4x Akkus geeignet seriell - parallel Konfiguration versilberte Kontakte. Tolle Angebote bei eBay für vaperz cloud hammer of god. Sicher einkaufen. Looks like “E Zigarette (Box Mod) Hammer of God V1/V2” has already been sold. Check out some similar items below! You may be also. Hence, dystopian fiction is much more common. Eventually, Mr. Original Title. Rating details. This review has been hidden because continue reading contains spoilers. It is one that touches upon many of the topics that Pastors and Lutheran Laity run. Those who view good works as some sort of sacrifice for debt have likely yet to this web page the spiritual ecstasy and love that https://ice-art.se/serien-stream-legal-kostenlos/tv-sender.php accompany good works. These were absolutely amazing ideas to read, and will rate it very high. Computers are now part of everyday life, although as written from the perspective of perhaps not as much as social media would predominate today. Plot is exactly what you would expect from Clarke.

Hammer Of God Video

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Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing. Visit my eBay store. Search Store. Store Categories. Also THoG is written by the big man Clarke himself, and seems more widely known with 3.

That article itself, though limited by Wikipedia restrictions, covers A LOT of the stuff I might otherwise have put here.

Good fiction about realistic utopia is relatively rare and the excuse I've heard is that, by definition, it is difficult to create interesting stories about conflict and challenges in a utopian civilization.

Going through the descriptions of the boatloads of books out there, it seems most writers find it difficult to just create realistic interesting stories.

Hence, dystopian fiction is much more common. Too common. Unnecessarily common and lazily thought out, if you ask me. Some of the recent surveying of fiction I have done, is with a rudimentary plan to understand the history of and maybe contribute to, utopian fiction in some way.

Taking care of health, work and family duties being the priority, reviews etc. The society is somewhat utopian in THoG. And although the setting is secondary to plot, and the choice of the setting seems less due to Clarke's interest in writing an utopia and more due to contemporary predictions about Comet Swift-Tuttle, he still has created a pretty interesting utopia, albeit justifiably?

Apart from the very intriguing socio-political and religious bits, the discussion of various futuristic technologies as well as speculations about fundamental physics force fields, 'restricted' wormholes and the verified one — gravitational waves is succinct.

From Lagrangian points to composition of asteroids, Clarke also describes real concepts with accuracy and clarity.

The action and suspense is also quite entertaining. However, I think Robert Singh's life events took too much, space sounds punny, I know, I know , without adding much for the reader.

A septuagenarian and residing away from his place of birth, he also has quite a few parallels to Clarke. Clarke might just have indulged a bit there.

There's quite some lost potential there, I think. Also, I think an advanced society as THoG's would have got a more robust plan, though the unexpected delay in the asteroid's detection might explain away that argument.

Though, I don't think there was even a mention of an insurance plan - like the cave construction in Deep Impact movie.

It is an interplanetary civilization in the book, granted, but Clarke missed quite a few aspects of the scenario, I'd say. Compared to Moonfall, the action also is quite straightforward and less intense, and the futuristic setting also doesn't quite compensate for that, considering a cinematic view.

So, overall both the books have different strengths and weaknesses, and I like both of them quite equally. Moonfall might have a slight edge due to its more intricate story and the near future setting.

This was my first read of a Clarke book. The language was good but never quite spectacular IMHO. Here's an interesting article: io9.

Contrary to the words there, it's actually quite appreciative of Clarke, while providing critique of his skill. I haven't read the earlier ASO, and having watched the movie, I have no plans to do so — however technically groundbreaking it might be, as far as the story goes, it seems inconsequential and pretentious.

BTW, I think there's a major goof in the book History of Fiction about Impact Avoidance For how important and interesting impact avoidance is, I think the science fiction community was a bit late to bring their attention to the topic.

Apart from Vernes' and Wells' somewhat related works, it seems it was Clarke himself who brought this theme to attention in 's Rendezvous with Rama.

Though, from its wiki summary, I can tell I came across one surprising find, which well might be the earliest novel to discuss impact avoidance — 's Dhoomketu by Indian astrophysicist-cum-writer Jayant Narlikar Indians might know of Narlikar from his alt-history story - 'The Adventure' - in one of the English school textbooks.

Then there's the Sean Connery movie Meteor. The Acknowledgement section in The Hammer of God is detailed, and there itself some of the history of the subgenre and of real impact events are discussed and so is their influence in the inception of the novel.

Lucifer's Hammer gets praise and even Meteor does, to an extent. Here's an important point though As mentioned in the book's wiki article, it was only in the s that the impact event hypothesis of the K-Pg extinction event got published, and just that pretty much led to this novel.

I had no idea that humans landed on the moon BEFORE coming anywhere close to confirming the cause of dinosaurs' extinction. But then, considering the money spent and the geopolitical factors, it is not surprising that the moon landings happened earlier than quite a few scientific and social developments.

The subsequent conception of Deep Impact, Armageddon and even Moonfall, and general increase in awareness of such events might have also been due to the spectacular collision of Comet Shoemaker—Levy 9 with Jupiter in Feb 16, Arko rated it really liked it Shelves: science-fiction.

My very first Arthur C. Clarke novel and it really gave me a thrilling ride within our Solar system with vivid details and his praiseworthy foresight.

The beauty of a novel by Clarke , I felt is in the way he goes into the scientific details and sculpts out a thrilling tale with impressive foresight which has good chances to be realized some day in future.

The story of this novel might be a straight forward one, omitting numerous difficulties in space travel, yet the strength in his picturizatio My very first Arthur C.

The story of this novel might be a straight forward one, omitting numerous difficulties in space travel, yet the strength in his picturization infused with cutting edge scientific developments at the time of writing this novel is very appreciable.

The asteroid impact aimed to be averted in this novel will indeed be reality some day as there lurks innumerable such floating chunks having the potential of wiping all earthly living species.

Such an incident was indeed blocked by Jupiter in Not every time the coordinates will be in our favour. Already Apophis was feared to be returned from the gravitational key hole point which would miss Earth by few million kilometers only.

One day we will indeed be attempting to terraform Mars and investigate the water rich satellites Europa and Enceladus. But a project for deflecting comets or asteroids will be very imprtant to save impacts with our home planet.

Much like how Clarke visualizes in this novel. Nov 07, Bryan Alkire added it. This one is ok. The idea was interesting and the solution ingenious.

Clarke does science well, not something that can be said of all SF writers. My main issue is that I found the narrative structure a bit jarring at times, almost seems as though the book was This one is ok.

My main issue is that I found the narrative structure a bit jarring at times, almost seems as though the book was written as a movie… On the whole I give this one a 3.

Mar 17, Jeff Johnston rated it liked it Shelves: my-library. Doesn't bore you too much with over emphasis on the science, whilst employing some nice characterisations.

Absolutely loved the Mars references to his contemporaries, H. Aug 12, Maja Shinigami rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , prose , classics , sf.

You can destroy my Kali anytime, Mr. Dec 28, Robin Pilgrim rated it really liked it. Arthur C Clarke did it again. Apr 28, Sharon rated it liked it.

An interesting scifi story about the efforts of human inhabitants of Mars to prevent an asteroid from impacting with and destroying the earth.

Various actual earth events are cited and these give the story added depth meaning. Jul 27, Karl Kindt rated it liked it Shelves: Well, at least it was coherent, unlike his previous novel.

This story is best when ACC is explaining orbital mechanics and things related to the planets. Again he hatefully attacks all religion except Hinduism, sort of and asserts judgmental claims without support and shows he knows little about real politics, human sexuality, and women.

This was an interesting book to read. I almost wish I had read it 'way back when' it first came out. I found myself wondering if he would have changed anything prior to releasing the book if it had been written and released after Shoemaker-Levy collided with Jupiter.

It was a decent book; it held my interest throughout the entire reading. It was not a nail-biter, by any means, but it was still a fun read.

It has a lot of sections [chapters] 'building the backstory' and building up to the present. I think the author could have done a better job indicating which parts of the book were 'the past' and which were 'the present'; a couple of times I did get a little confused when reading and had to backtrack to see what I had missed.

In regard to religion - I thought the author had an interesting concept [I guess]. Christianity is the world's largest religion with over two billion adherents, followed by Islam and then Hinduism.

I could see Hinduism become the world's largest religion depending on how many converts shifted to Chrislam. I did not fully understand how or why this religion came into existence, other than it having to do with US soldiers being exposed to Islam during the first Gulf War.

Just because they were exposed does not mean such a thing would happen, but let's not quibble. It worked for the story. It had an interesting mix of 'sci-fi stuff' in it.

Food on Earth [and the Moon and Mars] was created by reusing [recycling] human waste products to create food. Some animals were no longer alive, but they could be re-engineered and genetically modified because their entire DNA was recorded in computer banks around the world.

There is a device that you wear over your entire head and it allows you to experience recordings and incoming messages in 3D. There is no FTL travel in the book, though.

People received messages via 'spacefax' as opposed to a computer printout. People are limited to two children [although that must be limited to your current spouse as Robert is divorced and remarried; he has an adult child on Earth and two children on Mars].

There were habitats on the Moon and Mars; people lived out around Jupiter, as well. There were robots, artificial intelligences, and experimental space suits used during the Moon [Lunar?

I did find one part of the book especially 'funny'. In addition, the crew quits exercising and eats so much food that they individually put on a minimum of ten pounds each.

It just struck me as funny, that they fully gave in to the whole 'let's eat, drink, and be merry, because tomorrow we may die!

The crew was rescued by their sister ship, the Hercules. I had read the novelization of the movie Meteor 'back in the day' [in which the Russians and Americans worked together to try and stop an incoming space rock from destroying the planet].

Of course, the 'bad' reviews for Shiva Descending may discourage me from reading it. We'll see. Overall, I am glad I [finally] read this book [as I have thought about reading it for quite some time, now].

Apr 15, J. I went to the library looking for "Lucifer's Hammer"--it was out--after writing a flash fiction piece about a meteor strike and wound up picking this off the shelf for a quick read instead.

Written in , this one of Clarke's last works and it clocks in at a relatively short pages. It was actually a perfect length for the amount of story Clarke has to tell, which wasn't much.

Getting the basics out of the way, Clarke is a legendary writer, but his skills were more suited to the Golden Age of I went to the library looking for "Lucifer's Hammer"--it was out--after writing a flash fiction piece about a meteor strike and wound up picking this off the shelf for a quick read instead.

Getting the basics out of the way, Clarke is a legendary writer, but his skills were more suited to the Golden Age of Sci-Fi than what I would expect from 90's or modern Sci-Fi.

I grew up reading him and Heinlein among others so I still enjoy the slower pace and philosophical filler. It's clear that at age 76 Clarke was more suited as a futurist than writer of gripping tales.

The plot is simple, the characters are stock, and there's nothing innovative or original about how the story unfolds. Basic premise: an asteroid is headed for Earth and will wipe out most of the population if it is allowed to hit unimpeded.

I was really hoping for a futurist's take on apocalyptic scenarios with asteroids, but this part is very thin.

If anything the book is PRE-apocalypic fiction. It never rises to the level of mass extinction, so most if not all of the emotional punch of the book evaporates at the end.

This is compounded by the fact that Clarke's world has long-standing permanent settlements on the Moon and Mars, which means even if the Earth was obliterated by the asteroid--mankind is not in jeopardy of extinction.

The plot point I thought made this incredibly mediocre was that the Goliath's mission was singular and sabotaged. You have a space-faring civilization capable of great things, and a year of advance notice, and they send ONE 30 year old ship to avert disaster for billions of people.

If I know engineers--and I do--they don't allow single points of failure and razor-thin tolerances for missions this important.

It's not like they don't have other ships;they do. Yes, they were sabotaged by a silly group of religious fanatics, but it's a thin Deus Ex Machina to build SOME sort of tension at the end of the book.

Don't get me wrong, I did enjoy the book. There's some nobility in sacrificing your life for Earth's masses--even when they voted to nuke you.

By page , I ceased to care about Robert Singh's future and I would have preferred he died a hero's death.

My favorite aspect of the novellas was seeing how the theological problems of 19th and early 20th century Sweden are still around today - truly, there is nothing new under the sun.

It lends a bit of perspective to current theological debates. On the other hand, I did not enjoy the writing style; it was too simplistic and a bit artless.

Perhaps this is simply because I'm reading the novellas in translation and they are better in the original Swedish.

I also was a bit disappointed with the characterization of the three pastors. They seemed like the same naive, confused, ineffective young pastor set in three different periods.

The more interesting characters are almost always the townspeople and farmers that live in the pastors' parishes.

Perhaps Giertz was less interested in creating memorable characters than in creating characters who were ripe for memorable mistakes and theological epiphanies?

The plots of these novellas are driven much less by events of the world-at-large than by the inner journeys of the three pastors. May 25, Fredösphere rated it liked it.

It's good, once in a while, to read a book that you would never chose according to your usual algorithms.

I picked this book as part of research for a short story I'm writing about Lutheran life in small-town Sweden from a century ago.

I learned about a few new things, notably about the highly efficient, low-maintenance ceramic stoves that most Swedes use instead of fireplaces or Franklin stoves.

Bo Giertz was a pastor and theologian, and this novel, consisting of three loosely-linked novellas, i It's good, once in a while, to read a book that you would never chose according to your usual algorithms.

Bo Giertz was a pastor and theologian, and this novel, consisting of three loosely-linked novellas, is concerned with the things pastors would be concerned with: two farmers suing each other over a dead cow; a young man's refusal to marry the woman he got pregnant.

I give this book only 3 stars because it never quite comes together into a compelling narrative. The plotting is rudimentary and the characterization is minimal.

Mostly, it's a bunch of people talking about God, sin, and salvation. Giertz's real strength is in his piety and his wisdom in applying spiritual truths to everyday life.

His ability to cut through the fog of human doubt and vanity must have served him well as a pastor and I understand his devotional literature of which he wrote much was beloved by many.

I just don't think writing novels was his calling. I'd recommend this curious book for people like me with a specific research interest.

Jul 04, Jim B rated it it was amazing Shelves: christian , christian-fiction , lutheran-fiction. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. In three eras, a pastor is trying to revive the spiritual lives of his people -- to some degree with success, always relying on pietistic use of the law, always discovering freedom and peace in the gospel of Jesus Christ.

In each story, there is a different facet. For example, the last section turns on the authority of Scripture. Insight into Lutheranism in a situation where the Lutheran Church is the state church.

In all three eras, there was a mission society and that was where the "revivals" g In three eras, a pastor is trying to revive the spiritual lives of his people -- to some degree with success, always relying on pietistic use of the law, always discovering freedom and peace in the gospel of Jesus Christ.

In all three eras, there was a mission society and that was where the "revivals" grew out of, while the church government -- centered in the "Cathedral Chapter" always posed a danger to what was going on.

I'd like to reread this book because there are "connections" I didn't see the first time. Bo Giertz was an atheist until he went to university and was disgusted by the egotism and selfishness of other atheists and impressed by the character of Christians.

He became a Christian, a Lutheran pastor, and the youngest bishop in Sweden. He is the Swedish C. This book is a trilogy, considered his best, a best seller in the 's.

My husband's been telling me for years I needed to read this book, as has Pastor Hill. For whatever reason, this last time Pastor told me I should read it, I decided to finally go ahead and do it.

And I'm glad I did. At times, the writing got a little flowery and overdone for my tastes, but the stories themselves were really interesting.

With the parishoners and Pastors who found themselves in error on doctrine, it was interesting to see that I could identify so many other denominations in the My husband's been telling me for years I needed to read this book, as has Pastor Hill.

With the parishoners and Pastors who found themselves in error on doctrine, it was interesting to see that I could identify so many other denominations in the errors I found myself putting notes in my books noting "Presby" or "Meth" Enjoyable read.

My hubby and Pastor were right to suggest it! Jan 30, Benjamin rated it liked it Shelves: seminary. While I found several crisp paragraphs, theologically invigorating concepts, the narrative flow felt abrupt, jagged, and forced.

Or, maybe I just didn't feel swept away like my friends. Timing, after all, means the most for a book. A book can come to you in the best timing, be the worst written thrashing of English, and still change your life.

I, however, will settle this time with a pocketful of pithy paragraphs which may or may not make a difference.

It was very Lutheran More nuanced than your average book of "fiction apologetics," but at times the story was cringe worthy.

The writing style was always enjoyable meaning there weren't clunky sentences , but the plot was struggling along. Every one of the three scenes consisted of a bad person, a person who thought they were good but really aren't insert Lutheran theology here , and a guy who has been around the block enough to know better than the other two usually an older pastor who is It was very Lutheran Every one of the three scenes consisted of a bad person, a person who thought they were good but really aren't insert Lutheran theology here , and a guy who has been around the block enough to know better than the other two usually an older pastor who is saintly and drinks whiskey.

Not a great book. Probably if you aren't lutheran you'll find it annoying. And if you are Lutheran you probably don't want to read about Lutherans in Sweeden or wherever it took place.

Feb 03, Glenn Crouch rated it it was amazing Shelves: theology. Whilst it took me a little while to get into and to "adjust" to the Scandinavian background of which I must admit I have very limited knowledge , I thoroughly enjoyed this book and do highly recommend it to fellow Pastors.

Admittedly and naturally it has a strong Lutheran emphasis - but as a Lutheran Pastor, I did enjoy that : It was inspiring, thought-provoking, challenging and so much more.

I found it very easy to relate to the various characters even given the cultural and time period diffe Whilst it took me a little while to get into and to "adjust" to the Scandinavian background of which I must admit I have very limited knowledge , I thoroughly enjoyed this book and do highly recommend it to fellow Pastors.

I found it very easy to relate to the various characters even given the cultural and time period differences. I have much to dwell upon - which is good!

Jan 07, Matthew Mitchell rated it it was amazing. So glad I read it this month. View 1 comment. May 15, Rich rated it it was amazing. Good stories with appropriate law and gospel.

Rare combination. Mar 28, Shawn rated it liked it. Introduction In this well-written novel, Bo Giertz deploys a myriad of characters to examine many of the religious doctrines that have historically created dissension in the Christian church.

The cool thing about this novel is that Giertz uses his characters to unveil the absurdities of both sides of extremist positions.

We see God laying foundations of faith through repetitive generations against the shifty, slothful, arrogant, and wanton human resistance.

Humans belabor themselves way too much in creating doctrines, rules, sin-lists, theology, and ritual, instead of simply absorbing the real messages of Christ, which are love, forgiveness, and healing.

Following the death of Jesus and the Apostles, theology solidified into the most popular or most prevalent forms. Orthodoxy is quite simply the consolidation of opinion over time.

As a result, the spectrum of denominations span from Protestantism, seeking inspiration directly from Jesus and the Apostles, to Catholicism, which treats the revelations of Bishops and other religious figures as augmentations to the Word.

This term enlightens us to our own tendency to solidify widespread beliefs into orthodoxy in our own time. In the introduction, Hans Andrae rails against the diversity of such early 20th century movements as Pentecostalism or Liberation Theology, not embracing the fact that religion evolves.

However, as proof that it does evolve, we see today a Pope of the Liberation Theology persuasion. What if religion had never evolved beyond the selling of indulgencies, burnings at the stake, or an earth-centric universe?

Just as polytheism preceded Judaism and Judaism preceded Christianity, so our perceptions and understandings of God continue to evolve.

We err to limit ourselves to static conclusions about God, as rendered by those who lived in a different time and in a different context than ourselves.

The church will suffer if we get mired in the past and are unable to gain traction when facing the new moral questions of our day.

My personal experience has been that powerful spiritual experiences await us when we willingly venture among the impoverished of the world.

The character Savonius sees that what the impoverished Christian lacks in physical comforts is often overwhelmingly counteracted by a profound supernatural faith that can transcend even the most educated doctrinal convulsions expounded by any pious priest.

In this experience, Savonius is thwarted by the persistent unbelief of the dying peasant, and yet he witnesses another faithful peasant gain the conversion of the unbeliever before his final demise.

This experience opens an entire new world for Savonius, as he perceives the Essence of real Godliness and belief. And yet these men had the strength to bleed and conquer in the war beyond the Baltic.

It was to these he was now sent, and he would go forth in the power of God. He does this by portraying Savonius as mistake prone in his newfound zeal.

Savonius begins to preach with such fervor that he institutes widespread revival in the community. The members of the parish become discomforted as peasants crowd into the pews and the church is filled to standing room only.

And yet, with literary masterfulness, Giertz lets Savonius go too far in his zeal. In preaching against elaborate self-adornment, Savonius finds that one among his congregation ceases to wear a lovely broach that she inherited from her mother.

Giertz uses this extremism to display how our enthusiasm can go too far, ultimately cycling back into sin, as pretentious self-righteousness.

Perhaps the future direction of the evolution of the church is revealed in the radicalism of its day?

Grace v. You must so fully trust in Jesus that you may know that your salvation depends only on him. But we must understand that Giertz is purposefully using a very frivolous issue here to establish a point, which the reader may view very differently later in the novel, when the sin is more egregious.

It is easy for them to cast off the display of a mere brooch as inconsequential, but when the display becomes an illegitimate child, the pastors begin to back pedal against their own doctrine.

Nevertheless, when Savonius asks the Rector and the gentry to deny themselves; and to take up the cross, he is decried as a radical preacher and branded an enemy.

Is it any different among the affluent class today? How far does one go with self-adornment? Make-up, an expensive dress, elaborate jewelry, plumed hats, wigs, hair plugs, spray tan, giant heels, nail polish, face-lifts, tummy tucks, nose jobs, boob jobs, other tissue transplants?

What will ultimately stop us from cloning ourselves to ensure a standing supply of organ transplants? Where does it all stop?

Do we deploy our actions and finances for self-adornment or for Christ? We all go too far. It is finished! And so the pastors convene to defrock Savonius for all of his passionate preaching so that everything can return to the good old days of drunkenness, cursing, gambling, adultery, and such besotted misery, without all of this call for repentance.

Actually one sees more clearly all the while, though one is looking down at the dark pools of evil in the slough of sinful corruption.

But it is important to look deeply into it, for one will otherwise imagine that it is possible to get across it by oneself.

So one makes a few hops from hummock to hummock, but is soon mired. At the very worst, one does not even dare to admit that one is stuck fast, but claims that one is already across, only because one is no longer in the company of the self-secure sinners on the farther shore.

The concept that one would do good works for the simple joy of doing them seems beyond the Rectors capacity of understanding.

We should never partake of good works because we think it is something that we must do, but only for the sheer pleasure of doing them, for the enormously beautiful experience, and for keeping us closer to God.

Good works can give us a small glimpse of heaven. Those who view good works as some sort of sacrifice for debt have likely yet to experience the spiritual ecstasy and love that can accompany good works.

Unmerited grace does not mean that one should never do anything of merit. But the really cool part is the response Savonius gives when the edict comes down that he is to be reprimanded for his zeal in preaching.

This response simply lays the Gospel as bare as it can be for anyone, regardless of denomination, to see plainly.

Anyone who has been involved in ministry understands how much easier it is to love on and give attention to the little people of this world, the disenfranchised, the impoverished, those who have been abused since childhood, and those discriminated against.

The little people are so in need of love that, once one is resolved to love them, the love flows easily like water in a mighty stream.

But, the mindboggling thing that Savonius illuminates is how much harder it is to love the big people of the world.

To love those who are unreceptive, who respond to you arrogantly, who seek to belittle you, who relish in their wealth and treat your love as negligible.

How much harder it is to love and forgive in these circumstances. Savonius sees that, instead of railing against the affluent, who exploit the peasants and cage themselves within their wealth, he should be just as zealous in attempting to reach them.

The Biblical perspective differs in that the ministry of Christ was primarily to the poor, impoverished sinners. The Conscience Much ado is made in this novel about the conscience.

By the end of the novel, in his characterization of Schenstedt, Giertz seems to dismiss the conscience as negligible.

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